30 Idioms for Angry

Anger, a fiery emotion that can consume us in the blink of an eye, has found its linguistic expression in a myriad of idioms. These phrases vividly capture the intensity and diversity of our enraged states.

In this journey through the lexicon of anger, we will unravel the meanings and usage of 25 idioms that paint a picture of frustration, irritation, and boiling fury. Let’s dive into the world of expressions that vividly describe those moments when we’re more than just a little bit upset.

30 idioms for angry

Idioms for Angry

1. “See Red”

Meaning: To become extremely angry. Often used to describe a sudden, intense outburst of anger.

In a Sentence: When he insulted her family, she could feel herself beginning to see red.

2. “Boil Over”

Meaning: To become so angry that one’s anger spills out and is expressed in a violent or uncontrolled manner.

In a Sentence: The constant criticism made him boil over, and he couldn’t hold back his frustration any longer.

3. “Fuming”

Meaning: To be extremely angry and visibly upset.

In a Sentence: She was fuming when she discovered someone had taken credit for her hard work.

4. “Fit to Be Tied”

Meaning: To be extremely angry and agitated.

In a Sentence: His irresponsible actions left her fit to be tied as she tried to salvage the project.

5. “Hot Under the Collar”

Meaning: To be angry or agitated.

In a Sentence: His condescending remarks left her hot under the collar during the meeting.

6. “Steaming”

Meaning: To be extremely angry and visibly upset.

In a Sentence: The unfair decision left her steaming with frustration.

7. “Livid”

Meaning: To be extremely angry and furious.

In a Sentence: He was livid when he realized his ideas had been stolen without credit.

8. “Sick and Tired”

Meaning: To be fed up and angry about a situation or problem.

In a Sentence: After years of broken promises, she was sick and tired of the empty reassurances.

9. “Pissed Off”

Meaning: To be very angry or annoyed.

In a Sentence: The constant disruptions in the office had everyone pissed off by noon.

10. “Galled”

Meaning: To be annoyed or angered by something that is unfair or unjust.

In a Sentence: His lack of appreciation for her efforts truly galled her.

11. “Irate”

Meaning: To be extremely angry or annoyed.

In a Sentence: The customer became irate when his order was repeatedly mishandled.

12. “Fury”

Meaning: A state of extreme anger or rage.

In a Sentence: The unjust decision ignited a fury within the community.

13. “Incensed”

Meaning: To be very angry or outraged.

In a Sentence: The misleading headlines incensed the readers, leading to a public outcry.

14. “Outraged”

Meaning: To be very angry or indignant about something perceived as wrong or unfair.

In a Sentence: The activists were outraged by the blatant disregard for environmental regulations.

15. “Enraged”

Meaning: To be extremely angry or furious.

In a Sentence: The betrayal left her utterly enraged, unable to comprehend the depth of deceit.

16. “Seeing Red” (Revisited)

Meaning: To be very angry and likely to lash out or act aggressively.

In a Sentence: After the repeated insults, he was truly seeing red and ready to confront his antagonist.

17. “Mad as a Hornet”

Meaning: To be very angry or annoyed.

In a Sentence: His careless remarks had everyone in the room as mad as hornets.

18. “Through the Roof”

Meaning: To be extremely angry or upset.

In a Sentence: Her frustration levels went through the roof when the project deadline was suddenly moved up.

19. “Up in Arms”

Meaning: To be angry and actively protesting or opposing something.

In a Sentence: The controversial decision had the entire community up in arms, demanding justice.

20. “At the End of One’s Rope”

Meaning: To be at the point of exhaustion or frustration and ready to give up.

In a Sentence: After weeks of setbacks, he was at the end of his rope and considering quitting.

21. “In a Huff”

Meaning: To be angry and upset, often in a way that is childish or immature.

In a Sentence: She stormed off in a huff after the argument with her friend.

22. “In a Snit”

Meaning: To be in a bad mood or angry over something minor or insignificant.

In a Sentence: He’s in a snit because someone moved his desk chair.

23. “In High Dudgeon”

Meaning: To be in a state of anger or resentment, often as a result of being wronged or treated unfairly.

In a Sentence: The employee left in high dudgeon after being unfairly criticized in front of colleagues.

24. “On the Warpath”

Meaning: To be actively seeking to cause trouble or conflict, often as a result of being angry or upset.

In a Sentence: Watch out, she’s on the warpath after discovering the office gossip.

25. “Ready to Bite Someone’s Head Off”

Meaning: To be in a state of extreme anger and likely to lash out aggressively.

In a Sentence: After the constant interruptions, she was ready to bite someone’s head off.

26. “Having a Fit”

Meaning: To be in a state of extreme anger or outrage.

In a Sentence: When the project was delayed again, the manager was having a fit in his office.

27. “Fuming with Anger” (Revisited)

Meaning: To be extremely angry and visibly upset.

In a Sentence: His careless actions left her fuming with anger and disappointment.

28. “Fuming and Furious” (Revisited)

Meaning: To be extremely angry and visibly upset.

In a Sentence: The broken promises had the team fuming and furious, questioning their trust in leadership.

29. “Filled with Rage”

Meaning: To be in a state of extreme anger or fury.

In a Sentence: The blatant disregard for safety protocols left the workers filled with rage.

30. “Filled with Wrath”

Meaning: To be in a state of extreme anger or fury.

In a Sentence: The unfair treatment fueled her, leaving her filled with wrath and determined to seek justice.

Summary

IdiomMeaning
See RedBecome extremely angry, often describing a sudden, intense outburst of anger.
Boil OverBecome so angry that anger spills out in a violent or uncontrolled manner.
FumingExtremely angry and visibly upset.
Fit to Be TiedExtremely angry and agitated.
Hot Under the CollarAngry or agitated.
SteamingExtremely angry and visibly upset.
LividExtremely angry and furious.
Sick and TiredFed up and angry about a situation or problem.
Pissed OffVery angry or annoyed.
GalledAnnoyed or angered by something that is unfair or unjust.
IrateExtremely angry or annoyed.
FuryA state of extreme anger or rage.
IncensedVery angry or outraged.
OutragedVery angry or indignant about something perceived as wrong or unfair.
EnragedExtremely angry or furious.
Seeing RedVery angry and likely to lash out or act aggressively.
Mad as a HornetVery angry or annoyed.
Through the RoofExtremely angry or upset.
Up in ArmsAngry and actively protesting or opposing something.
At the End of One’s RopeAt the point of exhaustion or frustration and ready to give up.
In a HuffAngry and upset, often in a way that is childish or immature.
In a SnitIn a bad mood or angry over something minor or insignificant.
In High DudgeonIn a state of anger or resentment, often as a result of being wronged or treated unfairly.
On the WarpathActively seeking to cause trouble or conflict, often as a result of being angry or upset.
Ready to Bite Someone’s Head OffIn a state of extreme anger and likely to lash out aggressively.
Having a FitIn a state of extreme anger or outrage.
Fuming with AngerExtremely angry and visibly upset.
Fuming and FuriousExtremely angry and visibly upset.
Filled with RageIn a state of extreme anger or fury.
Filled with WrathIn a state of extreme anger or fury.

Conclusion

In the grand tapestry of language, idioms color our expressions with shades of emotion. The idioms for anger explored here, each with its unique hue, contribute to the rich palette of human communication. From the subtle irritation expressed in “Hot Under the Collar” to the explosive rage of “Bite Someone’s Head Off,” these idioms allow us to vividly articulate our feelings in a way that only language can.

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