30 Idioms for Greed

Welcome to the world of avarice, where the pursuit of wealth takes center stage, and the language itself paints vivid pictures of insatiable desire.

In this engaging exploration, we delve into the idioms for greed, those colorful expressions that capture the essence of our voracious appetite for more. So, buckle up as we embark on a linguistic journey through phrases that illustrate the human penchant for wealth accumulation.

30 idioms for greed

Idioms for Greed

To Have Fingers in Many Pies

Meaning: Being involved in multiple activities or having interests in various ventures.

In a Sentence: Sam truly has fingers in many pies; he’s a tech entrepreneur, a real estate investor, and a part-time chef.

To Kill the Goose That Lays the Golden Eggs

Meaning: To destroy a reliable source of income or a lucrative opportunity through greed or shortsightedness.

In a Sentence: By exploiting the company’s resources without reinvesting, the executives unknowingly killed the goose that laid the golden eggs.

Money Talks

Meaning: The persuasive power of wealth and financial influence.

In a Sentence: In the world of politics, it’s evident that money talks; campaign contributions often dictate policy decisions.

Money is the Root of All Evil

Meaning: The belief that the love or pursuit of money is the primary cause of immoral behavior.

In a Sentence: The ancient proverb warns, “Money is the root of all evil,” reminding us of the pitfalls of unbridled greed.

Grasping at Straws

Meaning: Attempting desperate measures when facing imminent failure or loss.

In a Sentence: In the face of bankruptcy, the failing company’s CEO is grasping at straws, hoping for a last-minute miracle.

The Midas Touch

Meaning: The ability to turn everything one touches into gold, often associated with success in business or finance.

In a Sentence: Ever since she started her own business, Lisa seems to have the Midas touch; every investment turns into a profitable venture.

A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing

Meaning: Someone who disguises their true, malicious nature behind a pleasant facade.

In a Sentence: The charming new colleague turned out to be a wolf in sheep’s clothing, manipulating others for personal gain.

To Feather One’s Nest

Meaning: Accumulating wealth for personal comfort and security, often through cunning means.

In a Sentence: While others struggled, he was busy feathering his nest with shrewd investments and strategic business moves.

To Line One’s Pockets

Meaning: Illicitly enriching oneself, typically through corrupt practices.

In a Sentence: The corrupt politician was caught red-handed, lining his pockets with public funds meant for infrastructure development.

To Milk a Cash Cow

Meaning: Exploiting a consistently profitable venture for maximum financial gain.

In a Sentence: Rather than diversifying, the company chose to milk the cash cow, relying solely on its flagship product for revenue.

To Have a Bottomless Pit

Meaning: Having an insatiable desire for more, especially when it comes to resources or wealth.

In a Sentence: His spending habits are like having a bottomless pit; no matter how much he earns, it’s never enough.

A Glutton for Punishment

Meaning: Someone who willingly endures hardship or difficulty, often due to their own actions.

In a Sentence: Staying in that toxic job for years, Sarah proved to be a glutton for punishment, blinded by the allure of a hefty paycheck.

To Have Eyes Bigger Than One’s Stomach

Meaning: Taking on more than one can handle or consume.

In a Sentence: Ordering the full-course meal despite being full, Tom had eyes bigger than his stomach.

To Bite the Hand That Feeds You

Meaning: Harming those who support or provide for you.

In a Sentence: By betraying his loyal investors, he unknowingly bit the hand that had fed him success for years.

A Dog in the Manger

Meaning: Someone who prevents others from enjoying something they themselves have no use for.

In a Sentence: His refusal to share the unused office space was like a dog in the manger, hindering the team’s expansion.

A Penny for Your Thoughts

Meaning: An invitation for someone to share their thoughts or feelings.

In a Sentence: Seeing her lost in thought, he said, “A penny for your thoughts,” hoping to understand her concerns.

To Have One’s Cake and Eat It Too

Meaning: Desiring to have the benefits of two conflicting options simultaneously.

In a Sentence: She wants to work full-time and travel extensively; it’s like trying to have her cake and eat it too.

To Have a Sweet Tooth

Meaning: Having a strong liking for sweets or a craving for sugary foods.

In a Sentence: Despite her efforts to stay healthy, Jenny can’t resist indulging her sweet tooth with a piece of chocolate every now and then.

To Be on a Shopping Spree

Meaning: Engaging in a series of extravagant shopping or spending activities.

In a Sentence: After receiving his bonus, Mark went on a shopping spree, splurging on luxury items he had long desired.

To Have a One-Track Mind

Meaning: Being excessively focused on a single goal or topic.

In a Sentence: When it comes to his career, James has a one-track mind, relentlessly pursuing success in his chosen field.

To Go for the Jugular

Meaning: To attack or confront a problem with maximum force and determination.

In a Sentence: In negotiations, it’s essential to go for the jugular, securing the best deal for your client.

To Squeeze Blood from a Stone

Meaning: Attempting to extract something of value from a situation or person that lacks the necessary resources.

In a Sentence: Trying to make profits from a failing business is like trying to squeeze blood from a stone; it’s an impossible task.

To Be a Bottomless Pit

Meaning: Having an endless appetite or desire for something.

In a Sentence: When it comes to learning new skills, she’s a bottomless pit, always seeking to expand her knowledge.

To Be Like a Kid in a Candy Store

Meaning: Experiencing overwhelming excitement or joy, often in a situation with numerous appealing options.

In a Sentence: Exploring the technology store, Tim felt like a kid in a candy store, surrounded by the latest gadgets and innovations.

To Have a Tiger by the Tail

Meaning: To be in a challenging or risky situation that is difficult to control.

In a Sentence: Investing in volatile stocks is like having a tiger by the tail; it can be exhilarating but also dangerous.

To Have a Green Thumb

Meaning: Having a natural talent or skill for gardening and cultivating plants.

In a Sentence: With her lush garden, it’s clear that Mary has a green thumb, effortlessly making plants thrive under her care.

To Be a Gold Digger

Meaning: A person who pursues a relationship primarily for financial gain.

In a Sentence: Some warned him that she might be a gold digger, interested more in his wealth than his character.

To Throw Money Down the Drain

Meaning: Wasting money on something unproductive or futile.

In a Sentence: Investing in that failed business was like throwing money down the drain; there was no return on the investment.

To Be as Greedy as a Pig

Meaning: Exhibiting extreme greed and avarice.

In a Sentence: Hoarding resources while others suffer is a sign of being as greedy as a pig, caring only for one’s own interests.

To Be All About the Benjamins

Meaning: Being focused on accumulating wealth, especially in terms of hundred-dollar bills.

In a Sentence: In the world of high finance, it’s often all about the Benjamins; success is measured in monetary terms.


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Summary

IdiomMeaning
To Have Fingers in Many PiesInvolved in multiple activities or ventures.
To Kill the Goose That Lays the Golden EggsDestroying a reliable source of income or opportunity through greed.
Money TalksPersuasive power of wealth and financial influence.
Money is the Root of All EvilBelief that the love or pursuit of money leads to immoral behavior.
Grasping at StrawsAttempting desperate measures when facing failure or loss.
The Midas TouchAbility to turn everything one touches into gold, often in business.
A Wolf in Sheep’s ClothingSomeone disguising a malicious nature behind a pleasant facade.
To Feather One’s NestAccumulating wealth for personal comfort, often through cunning means.
To Line One’s PocketsIllicitly enriching oneself, typically through corrupt practices.
To Milk a Cash CowExploiting a consistently profitable venture for maximum financial gain.
To Have a Bottomless PitHaving an insatiable desire for more, especially wealth or resources.
A Glutton for PunishmentWillingly enduring hardship, often due to one’s actions.
To Have Eyes Bigger Than One’s StomachTaking on more than one can handle or consume.
To Bite the Hand That Feeds YouHarming those who support or provide for you.
A Dog in the MangerPreventing others from enjoying something one has no use for.
A Penny for Your ThoughtsInvitation for someone to share their thoughts or feelings.
To Have One’s Cake and Eat It TooDesiring the benefits of conflicting options simultaneously.
To Have a Sweet ToothHaving a strong liking or craving for sweets.
To Be on a Shopping SpreeEngaging in extravagant shopping or spending activities.
To Have a One-Track MindBeing excessively focused on a single goal or topic.
To Go for the JugularAttacking or confronting a problem with maximum force.
To Squeeze Blood from a StoneAttempting to extract value from a situation or person lacking resources.
To Be a Bottomless PitHaving an endless appetite or desire for something.
To Be Like a Kid in a Candy StoreExperiencing overwhelming excitement in a situation with numerous options.
To Have a Tiger by the TailBeing in a challenging or risky situation that is difficult to control.
To Have a Green ThumbHaving a natural talent or skill for gardening and cultivating plants.
To Be a Gold DiggerPursuing a relationship primarily for financial gain.
To Throw Money Down the DrainWasting money on something unproductive or futile.
To Be as Greedy as a PigExhibiting extreme greed and avarice.
To Be All About the BenjaminsBeing focused on accumulating wealth, especially in terms of hundred-dollar bills.

Conclusion

And there you have it, a colorful tapestry of idioms that paint a vivid picture of the human inclination towards greed. These expressions, woven into the fabric of our language, serve as cautionary tales, humorous anecdotes, and mirrors reflecting the complex relationship between individuals and their pursuit of wealth.

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