30 Idioms for Books

Beyond the literal meanings, these idioms offer insights into the nuances of reading, storytelling, and even life itself. In this article, we’ll hit the books and delve into the intriguing meanings behind idioms that make our literary experiences richer.

30 idioms for books

1. Hit the Books

Meaning: To study or engage in intensive reading.

In a Sentence: As finals approached, Sarah decided to hit the books, immersing herself in her favorite subjects.

2. Face Value

Meaning: Accepting something as it appears, without questioning or analyzing.

In a Sentence: Although the story seemed unbelievable at face value, delving deeper revealed hidden truths.

3. Read Between the Lines

Meaning: To understand the hidden or implicit meaning in a text.

In a Sentence: The author’s subtle metaphors encouraged readers to read between the lines and explore the deeper emotions within the narrative.

4. Turn Over a New Leaf

Meaning: To start anew or make a fresh start.

In a Sentence: After a turbulent year, Mark decided to turn over a new leaf and pursue his passion for writing.

5. By the Book

Meaning: Following the rules and procedures precisely.

In a Sentence: The detective solved the case by the book, meticulously examining every piece of evidence.

6. Open a Can of Worms

Meaning: To create a complicated or troublesome situation.

In a Sentence: Bringing up the controversial topic at the family dinner opened a can of worms, leading to heated discussions.

7. Judge a Book by Its Cover

Meaning: Forming an opinion based on outward appearances.

In a Sentence: Despite his unconventional appearance, the eccentric artist taught us not to judge a book by its cover.

8. Throw the Book at Someone

Meaning: To charge someone with all available penalties.

In a Sentence: The prosecutor decided to throw the book at the repeat offender, seeking maximum punishment.

9. In Someone’s Good Books

Meaning: To be in someone’s favor or good graces.

In a Sentence: Completing the project ahead of schedule put Emily in the boss’s good books.

10. Close the Book On

Meaning: To conclude or put an end to something.

In a Sentence: After years of negotiations, the diplomats finally managed to close the book on the long-standing conflict.

11. Take a Leaf Out of Someone’s Book

Meaning: To imitate or follow someone’s example.

In a Sentence: Inspired by her mentor, Lily decided to take a leaf out of his book and pursue a career in environmental activism.

12. Every Trick in the Book

Meaning: Using every possible method, even if it’s deceitful or cunning.

In a Sentence: Determined to win the game, the chess player employed every trick in the book to outsmart his opponent.

13. Don’t Judge a Book by Its Cover (Again)

Meaning: Reiterating the importance of not forming opinions based on appearances.

In a Sentence: The lesson from the wise old man echoed: don’t judge a book by its cover.

14. In My Book

Meaning: According to one’s personal beliefs or standards.

In a Sentence: Honesty is crucial in my book; I appreciate straightforward communication.

15. Bookworm

Meaning: A person who loves reading and spends much time doing so.

In a Sentence: Jenny, a dedicated bookworm, could often be found lost in the pages of her favorite novels.

16. Bring to Book

Meaning: To hold someone accountable for their actions.

In a Sentence: The company was determined to bring the irresponsible employee to book for the financial discrepancies.

17. Cook the Books

Meaning: To manipulate financial records to deceive.

In a Sentence: Uncovering the accountant’s attempt to cook the books led to serious consequences for the company.

18. Keep One’s Nose in a Book

Meaning: To be constantly reading or studying.

In a Sentence: Even during vacation, Tom couldn’t resist keeping his nose in a book, devouring novels by the beach.

19. In Someone’s Black Books

Meaning: To be in disfavor with someone.

In a Sentence: Missing the important meeting landed Jake in the boss’s black books, jeopardizing his chances of promotion.

20. The Oldest Trick in the Book (Again)

Meaning: Referring to a well-known and often used deceitful tactic.

In a Sentence: The scam artist attempted the oldest trick in the book, but the vigilant victim saw through the scheme.

21. A Closed Book

Meaning: Something or someone that is not easily understood or known.

In a Sentence: Despite years of friendship, Sarah remained a closed book, revealing little about her personal life.

22. A Book by Its Cover (Again)

Meaning: A situation where appearances are deceiving.

In a Sentence: The rundown restaurant turned out to be a hidden gem—a classic case of not judging a book by its cover.

23. One for the Books

Meaning: An exceptional or memorable event.

In a Sentence: Winning the championship was truly one for the books, a moment etched in the team’s history.

24. A Turn-Up for the Books

Meaning: An unexpected or surprising event.

In a Sentence: The sudden success of the small startup was a turn-up for the books, defying all expectations.

Summary

IdiomMeaningExample Sentence
Hit the BooksTo study or engage in intensive readingAs finals approached, Sarah decided to hit the books, immersing herself in her favorite subjects.
Face ValueAccepting something as it appears, without questioning or analyzingAlthough the story seemed unbelievable at face value, delving deeper revealed hidden truths.
Read Between the LinesTo understand the hidden or implicit meaning in a textThe author’s subtle metaphors encouraged readers to read between the lines and explore the deeper emotions within the narrative.
Turn Over a New LeafTo start anew or make a fresh startAfter a turbulent year, Mark decided to turn over a new leaf and pursue his passion for writing.
By the BookFollowing the rules and procedures preciselyThe detective solved the case by the book, meticulously examining every piece of evidence.
Open a Can of WormsTo create a complicated or troublesome situationBringing up the controversial topic at the family dinner opened a can of worms, leading to heated discussions.
Judge a Book by Its CoverForming an opinion based on outward appearancesDespite his unconventional appearance, the eccentric artist taught us not to judge a book by its cover.
Throw the Book at SomeoneTo charge someone with all available penaltiesThe prosecutor decided to throw the book at the repeat offender, seeking maximum punishment.
In Someone’s Good BooksTo be in someone’s favor or good gracesCompleting the project ahead of schedule put Emily in the boss’s good books.
Close the Book OnTo conclude or put an end to somethingAfter years of negotiations, the diplomats finally managed to close the book on the long-standing conflict.
Take a Leaf Out of Someone’s BookTo imitate or follow someone’s exampleInspired by her mentor, Lily decided to take a leaf out of his book and pursue a career in environmental activism.
Every Trick in the BookUsing every possible method, even if it’s deceitful or cunningDetermined to win the game, the chess player employed every trick in the book to outsmart his opponent.
Don’t Judge a Book by Its Cover (Again)Reiterating the importance of not forming opinions based on appearancesThe lesson from the wise old man echoed: don’t judge a book by its cover.
In My BookAccording to one’s personal beliefs or standardsHonesty is crucial in my book; I appreciate straightforward communication.
BookwormA person who loves reading and spends much time doing soJenny, a dedicated bookworm, could often be found lost in the pages of her favorite novels.
Bring to BookTo hold someone accountable for their actionsThe company was determined to bring the irresponsible employee to book for the financial discrepancies.
Cook the BooksTo manipulate financial records to deceiveUncovering the accountant’s attempt to cook the books led to serious consequences for the company.
Keep One’s Nose in a BookTo be constantly reading or studyingEven during vacation, Tom couldn’t resist keeping his nose in a book, devouring novels by the beach.
In Someone’s Black BooksTo be in disfavor with someoneMissing the important meeting landed Jake in the boss’s black books, jeopardizing his chances of promotion.
The Oldest Trick in the Book (Again)Referring to a well-known and often used deceitful tacticThe scam artist attempted the oldest trick in the book, but the vigilant victim saw through the scheme.
A Closed BookSomething or someone that is not easily understood or knownDespite years of friendship, Sarah remained a closed book, revealing little about her personal life.
A Book by Its Cover (Again)A situation where appearances are deceivingThe rundown restaurant turned out to be a hidden gem—a classic case of not judging a book by its cover.
One for the BooksAn exceptional or memorable eventWinning the championship was truly one for the books, a moment etched in the team’s history.
A Turn-Up for the BooksAn unexpected or surprising eventThe sudden success of the small startup was a turn-up for the books, defying all expectations.

Conclusion

As we close the book on this exploration of idioms for books, it’s evident that these expressions add layers of meaning to our language. From hitting the books to turning over new leaves, these idioms bring vibrancy to our conversations, reminding us that language, like a good book, is a journey worth savoring.

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