30 Idioms for Children

These expressions are like secret codes that add a splash of color to everyday conversations, making language a playground of creativity. Let’s unravel the mystery behind each idiom and discover how they bring language to life.

30 idioms for children

Idioms for Children

1. “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush”

Meaning: Something you already have is more valuable than something you might get in the future.

In a Sentence: Tommy decided to keep his old toy because he knew a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.

2. “A penny for your thoughts”

Meaning: Someone is asking what someone else is thinking.

In a Sentence: Sarah looked lost in thought, so I asked, “A penny for your thoughts?”

3. “A picture is worth a thousand words”

Meaning: A visual image can tell a story or convey a message more effectively than words alone.

In a Sentence: Grandma’s photo album proves that a picture is worth a thousand words.

4. “A watched pot never boils”

Meaning: Time seems to pass more slowly when you’re waiting for something to happen.

In a Sentence: Jake tapped his foot impatiently, realizing a watched pot never boils.

5. “Add fuel to the fire”

Meaning: To make a situation worse by adding to it.

In a Sentence: Instead of calming the argument, shouting only served to add fuel to the fire.

6. “An apple a day keeps the doctor away”

Meaning: Eating healthy food can help prevent illness.

In a Sentence: Mom always insists we eat our fruits, saying, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.”

7. “Break a leg”

Meaning: A way of wishing someone good luck before a performance.

In a Sentence: On the day of the play, everyone wished Tim, “Break a leg!”

8. “Cry over spilt milk”

Meaning: To be upset about something that has already happened and cannot be changed.

In a Sentence: Mary, don’t cry over spilt milk; we can always clean it up.

9. “Curiosity killed the cat”

Meaning: Being too curious can lead to trouble.

In a Sentence: Bobby’s curiosity got the better of him when he opened the mysterious box – truly, curiosity killed the cat.

10. “Every cloud has a silver lining”

Meaning: Even in bad situations, there is something positive that can be found.

In a Sentence: After the storm, we found a rainbow – a reminder that every cloud has a silver lining.

11. “Fit as a fiddle”

Meaning: To be in good health.

In a Sentence: Despite his age, Grandpa exercises daily and is as fit as a fiddle.

12. “Haste makes waste”

Meaning: Rushing can lead to mistakes.

In a Sentence: Sarah realized that finishing her homework in haste only resulted in errors – truly, haste makes waste.

13. “It’s raining cats and dogs”

Meaning: It’s raining very hard.

In a Sentence: We canceled our picnic plans when it started raining cats and dogs.

14. “Knee-deep in work/trouble”

Meaning: To be very busy or to be in a lot of trouble.

In a Sentence: With exams approaching, Jenny found herself knee-deep in work.

15. “Put all your eggs in one basket”

Meaning: To put all your resources in one place, risking losing everything if something goes wrong.

In a Sentence: Diversify your investments; don’t put all your eggs in one basket.

16. “Actions speak louder than words”

Meaning: What someone does is more important than what they say.

In a Sentence: Rather than promising to help, Kevin decided to clean the garage – actions speak louder than words.

17. “Costs an arm and a leg”

Meaning: Something is very expensive.

In a Sentence: Buying that designer bag would cost an arm and a leg, so I opted for a more affordable one.

18. “Easier said than done”

Meaning: Something sounds simple in theory but is difficult to accomplish in practice.

In a Sentence: Everyone claimed fixing the car was easy, but John discovered it was easier said than done.

19. “Hit the nail on the head”

Meaning: To accurately identify or describe a problem or solution.

In a Sentence: Emily hit the nail on the head when she pointed out the real issue in the team’s project.

20. “In the heat of the moment”

Meaning: When emotions are running high, and people might act impulsively.

In a Sentence: Apologies were made in the heat of the moment, but later, calmer heads prevailed.

21. “It’s not rocket science”

Meaning: Something is not very difficult or complicated.

In a Sentence: Cooking a simple meal is not rocket science; anyone can do it.

22. “Let the cat out of the bag”

Meaning: To reveal a secret unintentionally.

In a Sentence: Sarah let the cat out of the bag about the surprise party, spoiling the fun.

23. “Make a long story short”

Meaning: To summarize or condense a long explanation or story.

In a Sentence: Let me make a long story short – the treasure was hidden in the backyard.

24. “Once in a blue moon”

Meaning: Something that happens very infrequently.

In a Sentence: Sarah visits us once in a blue moon, living in a different city.

25. “Out of the frying pan and into the fire”

Meaning: Going from one difficult situation to another, possibly worse situation.

In a Sentence: Escaping the strict teacher’s class, Tom found himself in detention – out of the frying pan and into the fire.

26. “Raining on someone’s parade”

Meaning: To ruin someone’s plans or good mood.

In a Sentence: Don’t start criticizing now; you’ll be raining on someone’s parade.

27. “Sell like hotcakes”

Meaning: Something is selling very quickly or well.

In a Sentence: The new video game is selling like hotcakes; everyone wants to play it.

28. “Speak of the devil”

Meaning: When the person you were just talking about appears.

In a Sentence: We were discussing Jenny, and speak of the devil, there she is.

29. “The ball is in your court”

Meaning: It’s now someone else’s turn to take action or make a decision.

In a Sentence: You’ve got the job offer; now, the ball is in your court – decide wisely.

30. “Throw in the towel”

Meaning: To give up or quit.

In a Sentence: After hours of trying to fix the broken computer, I decided to throw in the towel.

Summary

IdiomMeaning
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bushSomething you have now is more valuable than something you might get in the future.
A penny for your thoughtsAsking what someone else is thinking.
A picture is worth a thousand wordsVisual images convey a message more effectively than words alone.
A watched pot never boilsTime seems to pass slowly when waiting for something to happen.
Add fuel to the fireMaking a situation worse by adding to it.
An apple a day keeps the doctor awayEating healthy food helps prevent illness.
Break a legA way of wishing good luck before a performance.
Cry over spilt milkBeing upset about something that has already happened and cannot be changed.
Curiosity killed the catBeing too curious can lead to trouble.
Every cloud has a silver liningEven in bad situations, there is something positive that can be found.
Fit as a fiddleTo be in good health.
Haste makes wasteRushing can lead to mistakes.
It’s raining cats and dogsIt’s raining very hard.
Knee-deep in work/troubleTo be very busy or in a lot of trouble.
Put all your eggs in one basketTo risk losing everything by putting all your resources in one place.
Actions speak louder than wordsWhat someone does is more important than what they say.
Costs an arm and a legSomething is very expensive.
Easier said than doneSomething sounds simple in theory but is difficult to accomplish in practice.
Hit the nail on the headTo accurately identify or describe a problem or solution.
In the heat of the momentWhen emotions are running high and people might act impulsively.
It’s not rocket scienceSomething is not very difficult or complicated.
Let the cat out of the bagTo reveal a secret unintentionally.
Make a long story shortTo summarize or condense a long explanation or story.
Once in a blue moonSomething that happens very infrequently.
Out of the frying pan and into the fireGoing from one difficult situation to another, possibly worse situation.
Raining on someone’s paradeTo ruin someone’s plans or good mood.
Sell like hotcakesSomething is selling very quickly or well.
Speak of the devilWhen the person you were just talking about appears.
The ball is in your courtIt’s now someone else’s turn to take action or make a decision.
Throw in the towelTo give up or quit.

Conclusion

As we bid adieu to our journey through these whimsical expressions, remember, idioms are like little treasures in the vast landscape of language. They not only add a splash of fun but also offer valuable lessons.

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