30 Idioms for Hate

Hate, a powerful and often overwhelming sentiment, has found its place in the colorful spectrum of idioms. In this exploration, we’ll dive into the intriguing world of phrases that vividly capture the essence of disdain and resentment.

30 idioms for hate

Idioms for Hate

Cut like a knife

Meaning: To cause emotional pain or hurt deeply.

In a Sentence: His words cut like a knife when he criticized her work in front of everyone.

Burning bridges

Meaning: Irreparably damaging a relationship or connection.

In a Sentence: By spreading those rumors, she was effectively burning bridges with her closest allies.

Cold shoulder

Meaning: Deliberate act of ignoring or excluding someone.

In a Sentence: After the argument, she gave him the cold shoulder for days.

Poison pen

Meaning: Writing malicious or spiteful content.

In a Sentence: Her poison pen was evident in the scathing letter she sent to her former friend.

Out of sorts

Meaning: Feeling irritable or not quite oneself.

In a Sentence: Ever since the argument, she’s been out of sorts, snapping at everyone around her.

Under one’s skin

Meaning: Annoying or bothering someone.

In a Sentence: His constant criticism really gets under my skin.

Rub the wrong way

Meaning: To irritate or annoy someone.

In a Sentence: His condescending tone always rubs me the wrong way.

Grind one’s gears

Meaning: To cause irritation or frustration.

In a Sentence: The constant noise from the construction site really grinds my gears.

Stick in one’s craw

Meaning: To be deeply offensive or objectionable.

In a Sentence: His arrogant attitude tends to stick in my craw.

Eat one’s heart out

Meaning: To feel intense jealousy or longing.

In a Sentence: When she saw his new car, she could only eat her heart out.

Ruffle feathers

Meaning: To upset or disturb a situation.

In a Sentence: Bringing up that topic always seems to ruffle feathers at the family gatherings.

Drive up the wall

Meaning: To irritate or annoy intensely.

In a Sentence: His constant humming is enough to drive anyone up the wall.

Hit below the belt

Meaning: To unfairly attack someone in a sensitive area.

In a Sentence: Bringing up her past mistakes during the argument was a low blow, hitting below the belt.

Throw shade

Meaning: To express contempt or disrespect.

In a Sentence: She didn’t appreciate her colleague constantly throwing shade about her work.

Get on one’s nerves

Meaning: To irritate or annoy someone.

In a Sentence: The constant tapping of his pen really gets on my nerves during meetings.

Burn the midnight oil

Meaning: To work late into the night.

In a Sentence: To meet the deadline, they had to burn the midnight oil for several nights.

Hit the roof

Meaning: To react with extreme anger or frustration.

In a Sentence: When he found out about the broken vase, he hit the roof.

Stir the pot

Meaning: To provoke or instigate trouble.

In a Sentence: Bringing up that controversial topic at the dinner table is sure to stir the pot.

Kick up a fuss

Meaning: To create a commotion or make a big deal out of something.

In a Sentence: She kicked up a fuss when she realized her order was wrong.

Give the cold shoulder

Meaning: To intentionally ignore or snub someone.

In a Sentence: He decided to give her the cold shoulder after the argument.

Blow a fuse

Meaning: To lose one’s temper or become extremely angry.

In a Sentence: His constant interruptions made her blow a fuse during the meeting.

Water off a duck’s back

Meaning: Unaffected by criticism or negative remarks.

In a Sentence: No matter what they said, his confidence remained intact; it was like water off a duck’s back.

Rub salt in the wound

Meaning: To make a situation even more painful or difficult.

In a Sentence: Bringing up her failed project felt like rubbing salt in the wound.

Bite the hand that feeds you

Meaning: To harm someone who has helped or supported you.

In a Sentence: By betraying his closest ally, he was essentially biting the hand that feeds him.

Drive someone nuts

Meaning: To irritate or annoy someone to the point of frustration.

In a Sentence: The constant beeping of the alarm clock drove her nuts every morning.

Have a bone to pick

Meaning: To have a complaint or grievance.

In a Sentence: After the disagreement, she definitely had a bone to pick with her coworker.

Stir the hornet’s nest

Meaning: To provoke trouble or create a chaotic situation.

In a Sentence: Bringing up that controversial issue at the meeting was like stirring a hornet’s nest.

Grind one’s teeth

Meaning: To express frustration or anger.

In a Sentence: The constant delays made him grind his teeth in irritation.

Go up in smoke

Meaning: To fail or be destroyed.

In a Sentence: All their hard work seemed to go up in smoke when the project was canceled.

Drive someone round the bend

Meaning: To irritate or annoy someone to the point of frustration.

In a Sentence: The constant noise from the construction site was enough to drive anyone round the bend.

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Summary

IdiomMeaningExample Sentence
Cut like a knifeCause emotional pain or hurt deeplyHis criticism cut like a knife.
Burning bridgesIrreparably damage a relationship or connectionSpreading rumors burned bridges with allies.
Cold shoulderDeliberate act of ignoring or excludingShe gave him the cold shoulder after the argument.
Poison penWriting malicious or spiteful contentThe letter was filled with poison pen words.
Out of sortsFeeling irritable or not oneselfShe’s been out of sorts since the argument.
Under one’s skinAnnoying or bothering someoneHis criticism really gets under my skin.
Rub the wrong wayIrritate or annoy someoneHis tone always rubs me the wrong way.
Grind one’s gearsCause irritation or frustrationThe noise from the construction site grinds my gears.
Stick in one’s crawBe deeply offensive or objectionableHis attitude tends to stick in my craw.
Eat one’s heart outFeel intense jealousy or longingSeeing his new car, she could only eat her heart out.
Ruffle feathersUpset or disturb a situationThat topic always seems to ruffle feathers.
Drive up the wallIrritate or annoy intenselyThe constant humming drives me up the wall.
Hit below the beltUnfairly attack someone in a sensitive areaBringing up her past mistakes was hitting below the belt.
Throw shadeExpress contempt or disrespectShe didn’t appreciate her colleague throwing shade.
Get on one’s nervesIrritate or annoy someoneThe tapping of his pen really gets on my nerves.
Burn the midnight oilWork late into the nightTo meet the deadline, they burned the midnight oil.
Hit the roofReact with extreme anger or frustrationFinding out about the broken vase made him hit the roof.
Stir the potProvoke or instigate troubleBringing up that controversial topic stirs the pot.
Kick up a fussCreate a commotion or make a big deal out of somethingShe kicked up a fuss when her order was wrong.
Give the cold shoulderIntentionally ignore or snub someoneHe decided to give her the cold shoulder after the argument.
Blow a fuseLose one’s temper or become extremely angryConstant interruptions made her blow a fuse.
Water off a duck’s backUnaffected by criticism or negative remarksNo matter what they said, his confidence remained intact.
Rub salt in the woundMake a situation even more painful or difficultBringing up her failed project felt like rubbing salt in the wound.
Bite the hand that feeds youHarm someone who has helped or supported youBetraying his closest ally was biting the hand that feeds him.
Drive someone nutsIrritate or annoy someone to the point of frustrationThe constant beeping of the alarm clock drove her nuts.
Have a bone to pickHave a complaint or grievanceAfter the disagreement, she had a bone to pick with her coworker.
Stir the hornet’s nestProvoke trouble or create a chaotic situationBringing up that controversial issue stirred the hornet’s nest.
Grind one’s teethExpress frustration or angerThe constant delays made him grind his teeth.
Go up in smokeFail or be destroyedAll their hard work seemed to go up in smoke when the project was canceled.
Drive someone round the bendIrritate or annoy someone to the point of frustrationThe constant noise from the construction site drove anyone round the bend.

Conclusion

In the vast landscape of language, idioms for hate add a layer of vividness to our expressions. From cutting like a knife to driving someone round the bend, these phrases paint a picture of the diverse ways we navigate and communicate our deepest emotions.

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