30 Idioms for School

Today, we’ll take a stroll through the school of idioms—expressions that have found their way into everyday conversation, often leaving us scratching our heads or laughing out loud. So, without further ado, let’s dive into the meaning behind these phrases, one idiom at a time.

30 idioms for school

Idioms for School

1. “A Drop in the Bucket”

Meaning: A very small amount compared to what is needed.

In a Sentence: Our efforts to clean up the beach were like a drop in the bucket compared to the vastness of the pollution problem.

2. “A Piece of Cake”

Meaning: Something that is very easy to do.

In a Sentence: Solving that math problem turned out to be a piece of cake once I understood the formula.

3. “An Apple a Day Keeps the Doctor Away”

Meaning: Taking care of oneself can prevent illness.

In a Sentence: My grandma swears by the saying “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” and munches on one every morning.

4. “Break a Leg”

Meaning: A way of wishing someone good luck before a performance.

In a Sentence: Before my friend’s theater debut, I texted her to break a leg, hoping for a stellar performance.

5. “Curiosity Killed the Cat”

Meaning: Being too curious can lead to trouble.

In a Sentence: I couldn’t resist peeking into the forbidden room, but as they say, curiosity killed the cat—I knocked over a vase!

6. “Cut to the Chase”

Meaning: Get to the point.

In a Sentence: Instead of beating around the bush, let’s cut to the chase and discuss the main issue.

7. “Easy as Pie”

Meaning: Very easy.

In a Sentence: Navigating through the new software turned out to be as easy as pie after the tutorial.

8. “Hit the Books”

Meaning: Study.

In a Sentence: With exams around the corner, it’s time to hit the books and cram some knowledge into my brain.

9. “It’s All Greek to Me”

Meaning: Something that is difficult to understand.

In a Sentence: The instructions for assembling the furniture might as well be in Greek—it’s all Greek to me!

10. “Kill Two Birds with One Stone”

Meaning: To accomplish two things at the same time.

In a Sentence: By working from home, I can kill two birds with one stone—earn money and spend time with family.

11. “Learn the Ropes”

Meaning: Learn how to do something new.

In a Sentence: Starting a new job can be overwhelming, but give it some time, and you’ll learn the ropes.

12. “On the Ball”

Meaning: Being prepared and organized.

In a Sentence: She’s always on the ball, never missing a deadline or forgetting an assignment.

13. “Play by the Rules”

Meaning: Follow the rules.

In a Sentence: To succeed in any game, you have to play by the rules; otherwise, it’s chaos.

14. “Study Like a Dog”

Meaning: Study very hard.

In a Sentence: For the upcoming exams, I need to study like a dog, nose in the books and focused.

15. “Take the Bull by the Horns”

Meaning: Tackle a problem head-on.

In a Sentence: Instead of avoiding the issue, it’s time to take the bull by the horns and address the situation.

16. “A Blessing in Disguise”

Meaning: A good thing that initially seemed bad.

In a Sentence: Losing my job turned out to be a blessing in disguise—it pushed me to pursue my passion.

17. “Bite off More Than You Can Chew”

Meaning: To take on more tasks or responsibilities than one can handle.

In a Sentence: Accepting two internships might have been biting off more than I can chew; the workload is overwhelming.

18. “Burn the Midnight Oil”

Meaning: To work late into the night.

In a Sentence: Finishing the project on time required burning the midnight oil, but it was worth it.

19. “Cry over Spilled Milk”

Meaning: To worry about something that cannot be changed.

In a Sentence: Yes, I failed the test, but there’s no use crying over spilled milk; I’ll do better next time.

20. “Don’t Judge a Book by Its Cover”

Meaning: Don’t judge something based on appearances.

In a Sentence: The old library might look dull, but don’t judge a book by its cover—it holds hidden treasures inside.

21. “Easier Said Than Done”

Meaning: Something that is easy to say but difficult to do.

In a Sentence: Telling someone to overcome their fear of heights is easier said than done.

22. “Get Cold Feet”

Meaning: To lose one’s nerve or courage.

In a Sentence: Standing on the edge of the diving board, I got cold feet and couldn’t make the jump.

23. “In the Heat of the Moment”

Meaning: When one is caught up in the excitement or intensity of a situation.

In a Sentence: I didn’t mean to snap at my friend; it happened in the heat of the moment during the argument.

24. “Jump the Gun”

Meaning: To act too quickly without thinking.

In a Sentence: I may have jumped the gun by buying concert tickets before confirming my friend’s availability.

25. “Let Sleeping Dogs Lie”

Meaning: To not bring up a past issue or to avoid causing trouble.

In a Sentence: We had our differences, but it’s best to let sleeping dogs lie and move forward.

26. “Miss the Boat”

Meaning: To miss an opportunity.

In a Sentence: Not investing in cryptocurrency earlier made me feel like I had missed the boat.

27. “On Thin Ice”

Meaning: In a risky or dangerous situation.

In a Sentence: Submitting the assignment a day late felt like I was on thin ice with the strict professor.

28. “Pull Someone’s Leg”

Meaning: To tease or joke with someone.

In a Sentence: When my friend insisted he met a celebrity, I thought he was pulling my leg until I saw the pictures.

29. “Rain on Someone’s Parade”

Meaning: To ruin someone’s plans or enjoyment.

In a Sentence: Announcing the bad news during the celebration was a sure way to rain on someone’s parade.

30. “See the Writing on the Wall”

Meaning: To sense that something bad is going to happen.

In a Sentence: After consecutive losses, the coach could see the writing on the wall—it was time for a strategy change.

Summary

IdiomMeaningExample Sentence
A Drop in the BucketVery small amount compared to what is neededOur efforts were just a drop in the bucket for the cleanup.
A Piece of CakeSomething very easy to doSolving that math problem was a real piece of cake.
An Apple a Day Keeps the Doctor AwayTaking care of oneself can prevent illnessGrandma believes in an apple a day to keep the doctor away.
Break a LegWishing someone good luck before a performanceI texted my friend to break a leg before her theater debut.
Curiosity Killed the CatBeing too curious can lead to troubleMy curiosity knocked over a vase—curiosity killed the cat.
Cut to the ChaseGet to the pointLet’s cut to the chase and discuss the main issue.
Easy as PieVery easyNavigating the software turned out to be easy as pie.
Hit the BooksStudyWith exams around, it’s time to hit the books.
It’s All Greek to MeDifficult to understandThe instructions might as well be in Greek—it’s all Greek to me!
Kill Two Birds with One StoneAccomplish two things at the same timeWorking from home helps kill two birds with one stone.
Learn the RopesLearn how to do something newGive it time, and you’ll learn the ropes of the new job.
On the BallBeing prepared and organizedShe’s always on the ball, never missing a deadline.
Play by the RulesFollow the rulesSuccess in any game requires playing by the rules.
Study Like a DogStudy very hardTo ace the exams, I need to study like a dog.
Take the Bull by the HornsTackle a problem head-onIt’s time to take the bull by the horns and address the issue.
A Blessing in DisguiseA good thing initially seeming badLosing my job turned out to be a blessing in disguise.
Bite off More Than You Can ChewTake on more tasks or responsibilities than one can handleAccepting two internships might be biting off more than I can chew.
Burn the Midnight OilWork late into the nightFinishing the project required burning the midnight oil.
Cry over Spilled MilkWorry about something that cannot be changedFailing the test is done; no use crying over spilled milk.
Don’t Judge a Book by Its CoverDon’t judge based on appearancesThe old library might look dull, but don’t judge a book by its cover.
Easier Said Than DoneEasy to say but difficult to doOvercoming a fear of heights is easier said than done.
Get Cold FeetLose one’s nerve or courageStanding on the diving board, I got cold feet and couldn’t jump.
In the Heat of the MomentCaught up in the excitement or intensity of a situationI didn’t mean to snap; it happened in the heat of the moment.
Jump the GunAct too quickly without thinkingBuying concert tickets before confirming was jumping the gun.
Let Sleeping Dogs LieNot bring up a past issue or avoid causing troubleIt’s best to let sleeping dogs lie and move forward.
Miss the BoatMiss an opportunityNot investing in cryptocurrency earlier made me miss the boat.
On Thin IceIn a risky or dangerous situationSubmitting the assignment late felt like being on thin ice.
Pull Someone’s LegTease or joke with someoneI thought he was pulling my leg about meeting a celebrity.
Rain on Someone’s ParadeRuin someone’s plans or enjoymentAnnouncing bad news during the celebration rained on their parade.
See the Writing on the WallSense that something bad is going to happenAfter consecutive losses, the coach saw the writing on the wall.

Conclusion

And there you have it—a glimpse into the colorful and sometimes perplexing world of school-related idioms. From breaking legs to biting off more than you can chew, these expressions add a touch of humor and wisdom to our daily conversations.

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