30 Idioms for Simple

Like finding an unexpectedly sunny day in the midst of a storm, these idioms add a touch of charm to our everyday language.

So, the next time you breeze through a task that’s a piece of cake, remember these idioms for simple, making communication not just easy but downright enjoyable. After all, in the rich tapestry of language, simplicity is the thread that weaves us all together.

30 idioms for simple

Idioms for Simple

1. “As easy as pie”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase is thought to come from the fact that pie is a common, simple dessert.

In a Sentence: Mastering the art of cooking became as easy as pie after attending that culinary class.

2. “Piece of cake”

Meaning: Also means something is very easy. The phrase may come from the idea that cake is a simple food that is easy to prepare.

In a Sentence: Navigating through the complex software turned out to be a piece of cake with the new user-friendly interface.

3. “A walk in the park”

Meaning: Something is easy or without difficulty. This phrase may come from the idea of a park being a relaxed, easy place to be.

In a Sentence: Solving that math problem felt like a walk in the park after studying the basics thoroughly.

4. “Child’s play”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase comes from the idea that children’s games are simple and easy to understand.

In a Sentence: Fixing the glitch in the computer system turned out to be child’s play for the seasoned IT expert.

5. “A breeze”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase may come from the idea of a light, refreshing wind being easy and comfortable.

In a Sentence: Completing the project ahead of schedule was a breeze with the team’s efficient collaboration.

6. “Like taking candy from a baby”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase comes from the idea that babies do not have the strength or knowledge to hold onto candy, so it would be easy to take from them.

In a Sentence: Negotiating the deal felt like taking candy from a baby; the terms were incredibly favorable.

7. “Easy as ABC”

Meaning: Something is very easy to understand or do. The phrase comes from the idea that the ABCs are the most basic building blocks of language and are easy to learn.

In a Sentence: Learning to ride a bike was as easy as ABC once the initial fear was overcome.

8. “A snap”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase comes from the idea of snapping one’s fingers, which is a quick, simple action.

In a Sentence: Figuring out the puzzle was a snap once the missing piece was found.

9. “A cinch”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase may come from the idea of a cinch being a simple, tight belt or strap that is easy to fasten.

In a Sentence: Cooking that recipe turned out to be a cinch with the step-by-step instructions.

10. “A duck soup”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase may come from the idea of duck soup being a simple, easy-to-make dish.

In a Sentence: After years of experience, solving complex equations became a duck soup for the mathematician.

11. “A no-brainer”

Meaning: Something is very easy to understand or do. The phrase comes from the idea that the decision or task at hand is so obvious that it doesn’t require much thought.

In a Sentence: Choosing the vacation destination was a no-brainer once they realized the unanimous love for the beach.

12. “A pushover”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase comes from the idea of someone who is easily persuaded or overpowered.

In a Sentence: Convincing him to join the project was a pushover; he was enthusiastic from the start.

13. “A cakewalk”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase may come from the idea of a cakewalk being a simple, leisurely walk.

In a Sentence: Completing the marathon felt like a cakewalk for the seasoned runner.

14. “A finger-snap”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase comes from the idea of snapping one’s fingers, which is a quick, simple action.

In a Sentence: Fixing the glitch in the code was a finger-snap for the tech wizard.

15. “A doddle”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase comes from the idea of something being so simple, effortless and easy that is like a doodle or small sketch.

In a Sentence: Planning the event turned out to be a doddle with the efficient event management team.

16. “A slam dunk”

Meaning: Something is very easy and straightforward. The phrase comes from basketball, where a slam dunk is a type of easy shot where the player jumps up and pushes the ball down through the hoop with one or both hands.

In a Sentence: Presenting the proposal to the client was a slam dunk; they loved the innovative ideas.

17. “A walk in the woods”

Meaning: Something is easy and natural. The phrase comes from the idea of a walk in the woods being a peaceful and leisurely activity.

In a Sentence: Learning the new software felt like a walk in the woods with the user-friendly interface.

18. “A piece of cake”

Meaning: Also means something is very easy. The phrase may come from the idea that cake is a simple food that is easy to prepare.

In a Sentence: Completing the crossword puzzle was a piece of cake for the word enthusiast.

19. “A cakewalk”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase may come from the idea of a cakewalk being a simple, leisurely walk.

In a Sentence: Winning the debate turned out to be a cakewalk for the eloquent speaker.

20. “A breeze”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase may come from the idea of a light, refreshing wind being easy and comfortable.

In a Sentence: Memorizing the script was a breeze with the actor’s natural talent.

21. “A sure thing”

Meaning: Something is certain to happen. The phrase comes from the idea of a sure thing being something that is guaranteed to happen.

In a Sentence: Investing in that startup seemed like a sure thing given their innovative approach.

22. “A snap of the finger”

Meaning: Something is very easy. The phrase comes from the idea of snapping one’s fingers, which is a quick, simple action.

In a Sentence: Setting up the new software was a snap of the finger for the tech-savvy team.

23. “A no-brainer”

Meaning: Something is very easy to understand or do. The phrase comes from the idea that the decision or task at hand is so obvious that it doesn’t require much thought.

In a Sentence: Choosing the color scheme for the website was a no-brainer; everyone agreed on the vibrant palette.

24. “A walk in the park”

Meaning: Something is easy or without difficulty. This phrase may come from the idea of a park being a relaxed, easy place to be.

In a Sentence: Completing the project ahead of schedule felt like a walk in the park with the efficient team.

25. “A drop in the bucket”

Meaning: Something is insignificant or small compared to a larger whole. The phrase comes from the idea of a drop of water being a small and insignificant amount compared to a bucket.

In a Sentence: The extra expense was just a drop in the bucket compared to the overall budget.

26. “A dime a dozen”

Meaning: Something is common and easy to find. The phrase comes from the idea that something is so common that it can be bought for a dime (a small amount of money), and that there are many of them.

In a Sentence: Vintage records from that era are a dime a dozen at the local thrift store.

27. “A feather in one’s cap”

Meaning: Something that is a source of pride or an accomplishment. The phrase comes from the idea of a feather being a symbol of achievement, and adding it to one’s cap to show one’s achievements.

In a Sentence: Completing the marathon was a feather in her cap, a testament to months of training.

28. “A feather in one’s cap”

Meaning: Something that is a source of pride or an accomplishment. The phrase comes from the idea of a feather being a symbol of achievement, and adding it to one’s cap to show one’s achievements.

In a Sentence: Winning the award was a feather in the team’s cap, recognizing their outstanding contributions.

29. “A penny for your thoughts”

Meaning: Someone wants to know what someone else is thinking. The phrase is used to express curiosity about someone else’s thoughts or feelings.

In a Sentence: As they stared into the horizon, he asked, “A penny for your thoughts?”

30. “A penny for your thoughts”

Meaning: Someone wants to know what someone else is thinking. The phrase is used to express curiosity about someone else’s thoughts or feelings.

In a Sentence: Observing her deep in contemplation, he jokingly said, “A penny for your thoughts?”

Summary

IdiomMeaningExample Sentence
As easy as pieVery easy; derived from the simplicity of pie making.Mastering the art of cooking became as easy as pie after the culinary class.
Piece of cakeVery easy; likens a task to the simplicity of cake preparation.Navigating through the complex software turned out to be a piece of cake.
A walk in the parkEasy or without difficulty; inspired by the relaxed nature of parks.Solving that math problem felt like a walk in the park after studying basics.
Child’s playVery easy; draws from the simplicity of children’s games.Fixing the glitch in the system turned out to be child’s play for the expert.
A breezeVery easy; inspired by the ease of a light, refreshing wind.Completing the project ahead of schedule was a breeze with efficient collaboration.
Like taking candy from a babyVery easy; suggests a task is as simple as taking candy from a baby.Negotiating the deal felt like taking candy from a baby; terms were favorable.
Easy as ABCVery easy to understand or do; relates to the simplicity of learning the ABCs.Learning to ride a bike was as easy as ABC once the initial fear was overcome.
A snapVery easy; refers to the quick, simple action of snapping one’s fingers.Figuring out the puzzle was a snap once the missing piece was found.
A cinchVery easy; may come from a simple, tight belt or strap that is easy to fasten.Cooking that recipe turned out to be a cinch with step-by-step instructions.
A duck soupVery easy; may come from a simple, easy-to-make dish.Solving complex equations became a duck soup for the seasoned mathematician.
A no-brainerVery easy to understand or do; implies a task is so obvious it requires little thought.Choosing the vacation destination was a no-brainer; everyone favored the beach.
A pushoverVery easy; based on someone who is easily persuaded or overpowered.Convincing him to join the project was a pushover; he was enthusiastic.
A cakewalkVery easy; may come from a simple, leisurely walk.Completing the marathon felt like a cakewalk for the seasoned runner.
A finger-snapVery easy; refers to the quick, simple action of snapping one’s fingers.Fixing the glitch in the code was a finger-snap for the tech wizard.
A doddleVery easy; based on something being so simple, effortless, and easy.Planning the event turned out to be a doddle with the efficient team.
A slam dunkVery easy and straightforward; from basketball’s easy shot of a slam dunk.Presenting the proposal was a slam dunk; the client loved the innovative ideas.
A walk in the woodsEasy and natural; inspired by the peaceful nature of a walk in the woods.Learning the new software felt like a walk in the woods with the user-friendly interface.
A piece of cakeVery easy; likens a task to the simplicity of cake preparation.Completing the crossword puzzle was a piece of cake for the word enthusiast.
A cakewalkVery easy; may come from a simple, leisurely walk.Winning the debate turned out to be a cakewalk for the eloquent speaker.
A breezeVery easy; inspired by the ease of a light, refreshing wind.Memorizing the script was a breeze with the actor’s natural talent.
A sure thingCertain to happen; something guaranteed.Investing in that startup seemed like a sure thing given their innovative approach.
A snap of the fingerVery easy; refers to the quick, simple action of snapping one’s fingers.Setting up the new software was a snap of the finger for the tech-savvy team.
A no-brainerVery easy to understand or do; implies a task is so obvious it requires little thought.Choosing the color scheme for the website was a no-brainer; everyone agreed on the vibrant palette.
A walk in the parkEasy or without difficulty; inspired by the relaxed nature of parks.Completing the project ahead of schedule felt like a walk in the park with the efficient team.
A drop in the bucketInsignificant or small compared to a larger whole; likened to a drop of water in a bucket.The extra expense was just a drop in the bucket compared to the overall budget.
A dime a dozenCommon and easy to find; suggests something is very common.Vintage records from that era are a dime a dozen at the local thrift store.
A feather in one’s capA source of pride or accomplishment; refers to adding a feather to one’s cap to show achievements.Completing the marathon was a feather in her cap, a testament to months of training.
A penny for your thoughtsSomeone wants to know what someone else is thinking; expressing curiosity.Observing her deep in contemplation, he jokingly said, “A penny for your thoughts?”

Conclusion:

And there you have it – a whirlwind tour of idioms that make simplicity shine. These phrases aren’t just linguistic quirks; they’re windows into our shared understanding of the effortless, the straightforward, and the downright easy.

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