30 Idioms for Hungry

Today, let’s explore a feast of idioms centered around the theme of hunger. From “Eating like a horse” to “Eating one’s own dog food,” these expressions add a flavorful twist to our understanding of being hungry, full of amusing anecdotes and relatable scenarios.

30 idioms for hungry
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Idioms for Hungry

“Eating like a Horse” – To Eat a Lot or Very Quickly

Meaning: When someone is said to be “eating like a horse,” it means they are consuming a substantial amount of food or doing so with remarkable speed.

In a Sentence: After the marathon, Sarah was eating like a horse, devouring a giant burger and fries without pausing for breath.

“Hungry as a Bear” – To Be Extremely Hungry

Meaning: Comparing hunger to that of a bear implies an intense and overwhelming hunger.

In a Sentence: Having missed lunch, Tom was hungry as a bear, searching the fridge for anything edible.

“Starving” – To Be Extremely Hungry

Meaning: “Starving” is a straightforward term indicating extreme hunger, often used in casual conversations.

In a Sentence: I forgot to pack lunch, and by midday, I was absolutely starving.

“Peckish” – Slightly Hungry

Meaning: When someone is feeling “peckish,” it means they are experiencing a mild or slight hunger.

In a Sentence: Before dinner, I’m just a little peckish, so I’ll grab a small snack.

“Famished” – Extremely Hungry

Meaning: To be “famished” is to experience a level of hunger beyond the ordinary, signaling a desperate need for food.

In a Sentence: After the hike, we were famished and devoured the picnic spread in record time.

“Ravenous” – Extremely Hungry

Meaning: Similar to “famished,” being “ravenous” denotes an intense and insatiable hunger.

In a Sentence: The aroma from the bakery made me feel absolutely ravenous, so I bought a baguette on the spot.

“Rumble in the Stomach” – To Have a Stomach Growling from Hunger

Meaning: When there’s a “rumble in the stomach,” it refers to the audible noises produced by hunger.

In a Sentence: During the meeting, my stomach had a noticeable rumble, embarrassing me in front of my colleagues.

“Eating like a Bird” – To Eat Very Little

Meaning: Describing someone as “eating like a bird” suggests they have a small appetite and consume minimal amounts of food.

In a Sentence: While others indulged in the buffet, Jane was eating like a bird, sticking to a salad.

“Eating on the Run” – To Eat Quickly and Without Much Attention to the Food

Meaning: “Eating on the run” implies consuming food hastily, often due to a lack of time or urgency.

In a Sentence: With a busy schedule, Jack often resorts to eating on the run, grabbing snacks between meetings.

“Eating out of One’s Hand” – To Trust or Be Easily Controlled by Someone

Meaning: When someone is “eating out of one’s hand,” it means they trust or are easily influenced by another person.

In a Sentence: His charismatic personality had everyone eating out of his hand, believing every word he said.

“Eating Someone Alive” – To Criticize Someone Severely

Meaning: To “eat someone alive” is to criticize or attack them fiercely, often in a confrontational manner.

In a Sentence: During the debate, the opponent tried to eat her alive with relentless critiques.

“Eating One’s Words” – To Retract a Statement or Apologize for Something Said

Meaning: “**Eating one’s words” involves admitting that a statement was incorrect or apologizing for something previously said.

In a Sentence: After the results were announced, he had to eat his words about the team’s chances of winning.

“Eating Dirt” – To Suffer Humiliation or Defeat

Meaning: To “eat dirt” is to endure humiliation or experience a significant defeat.

In a Sentence: Despite his boasting, the overconfident athlete had to eat dirt when he lost the race.

“Eating Humble Pie” – To Apologize and Admit Being Wrong

Meaning: “Eating humble pie” involves apologizing and acknowledging one’s mistakes or errors.

In a Sentence: Realizing his error, the politician had to eat humble pie and issue a public apology.

“Eating Crow” – To Admit Being Wrong and Apologize for It, After a Boastful or Arrogant Statement

Meaning: Similar to “eating humble pie,” “eating crow” involves apologizing for boastful or arrogant statements after being proven wrong.

In a Sentence: After the project’s failure, the manager had to eat crow and apologize for his overly confident predictions.

“Eating Like There’s No Tomorrow” – To Eat a Lot Without Any Restraint

Meaning: “Eating like there’s no tomorrow” suggests indulging in a large quantity of food without any self-restraint.

In a Sentence: At the all-you-can-eat buffet, she was eating like there’s no tomorrow, savoring every dish.

“Eating Away At” – To Gradually Damage or Consume Something

Meaning: When something is “eating away at” a person or object, it signifies a gradual process of damage or consumption.

In a Sentence: The guilt of the mistake was eating away at her, affecting her overall well-being.

“Eating Out of the Palm of (Someone’s) Hand” – To Be Easily Controlled or Manipulated by Someone

Meaning: Being “eaten out of the palm of someone’s hand” indicates being easily controlled or manipulated by another person.

In a Sentence: The charming con artist had everyone eating out of the palm of his hand, unaware of his true intentions.

“Eating Away at (One’s) Nerves” – To Cause Someone to Feel Anxious or Stressed

Meaning: When a situation or person is “eating away at one’s nerves,” it means causing stress or anxiety.

In a Sentence: The impending deadline was eating away at her nerves, making it difficult to focus.

“Eating (Someone) Alive” – To Criticize or Attack Someone Fiercely

Meaning: Repeating the theme, “eating (someone) alive” signifies harsh criticism or fierce attacks directed at an individual.

In a Sentence: The harsh reviews were eating the artist alive, challenging his confidence in his work.

“Eating Up (Something)” – To Consume or Take in Something Eagerly

Meaning: To “eat up something” is to eagerly consume or take in a particular thing.

In a Sentence: The audience was eating up the comedian’s jokes, erupting into laughter with each punchline.

“Eating (Someone’s) Dust” – To Be Left Behind or Outdone by Someone

Meaning: Being “eaten by someone’s dust” implies being left behind or outperformed by a more competitive individual.

In a Sentence: In the final lap, the slower racer found himself eating the dust of his faster competitors.

“Eating Fire” – To Be Extremely Angry

Meaning: When someone is “eating fire,” it means they are experiencing intense anger or fury.

In a Sentence: His face turned red, and it was evident he was eating fire after the heated argument.

“Eating Humble Pie” – To Apologize and Admit Being Wrong (Repeated for Emphasis)

Meaning: As a reminder, “eating humble pie” involves apologizing and acknowledging one’s mistakes or errors.

In a Sentence: Realizing his error, the politician had to eat humble pie and issue a public apology.

“Eating the Bitter Pill” – To Accept a Difficult or Unpleasant Situation

Meaning: “Eating the bitter pill” signifies accepting a challenging or unpleasant reality.

In a Sentence: After the breakup, she had to eat the bitter pill of loneliness and move on.

“Eating One’s Own Cooking” – To Suffer the Consequences of One’s Own Actions

Meaning: To “eat one’s own cooking” is to experience the repercussions of one’s choices or actions.

In a Sentence: Ignoring warnings, he had to eat his own cooking when his procrastination led to missed deadlines.

“Eating One’s Own Dog Food” – To Test or Use a Product That One’s Own Company Produces

Meaning: “Eating one’s own dog food” involves personally testing or using a product that one’s own company produces.

In a Sentence: To ensure quality, the software developer believed in eating their own dog food, using their product daily.

“Eating (Someone’s) Lunch” – To Outcompete or Outperform Someone

Meaning: “Eating someone’s lunch” signifies outcompeting or surpassing someone in a competitive situation.

In a Sentence: With innovative strategies, the new startup was eating the established companies’ lunch in the market.

“Eating (One’s) Heart Out” – To Feel Very Sad or Disappointed

Meaning: When someone is “eating their heart out,” they are experiencing deep sadness or disappointment.

In a Sentence: Unable to attend the concert, I spent the night eating my heart out while listening to the live stream.

“Eating (Someone’s) Words” – To Force Someone to Retract a Statement or Admit They Were Wrong

Meaning: To “eat someone’s words” is to compel someone to retract a statement or admit their mistake.

In a Sentence: The evidence was overwhelming, forcing the skeptical critic to eat his words about the movie’s quality.

Summary

IdiomMeaningExample Sentence
Eating like a HorseTo eat a lot or very quicklyAfter the marathon, Sarah was eating like a horse.
Hungry as a BearTo be extremely hungryHaving missed lunch, Tom was hungry as a bear.
StarvingTo be extremely hungryI forgot to pack lunch, and by midday, I was starving.
PeckishSlightly hungryBefore dinner, I’m just a little peckish.
FamishedExtremely hungryAfter the hike, we were famished.
RavenousExtremely hungryThe aroma from the bakery made me feel ravenous.
Rumble in the StomachStomach growling from hungerDuring the meeting, my stomach had a noticeable rumble.
Eating like a BirdTo eat very littleWhile others indulged, Jane was eating like a bird.
Eating on the RunTo eat quickly without attention to the foodWith a busy schedule, Jack often eats on the run.
Eating out of One’s HandTo trust or be easily controlled by someoneHis charisma had everyone eating out of his hand.
Eating Someone AliveTo criticize someone severelyDuring the debate, the opponent tried to eat her alive.
Eating One’s WordsTo retract a statement or apologize for somethingAfter the results, he had to eat his words.
Eating DirtTo suffer humiliation or defeatThe overconfident athlete had to eat dirt after losing.
Eating Humble PieTo apologize and admit being wrongRealizing his error, the politician ate humble pie.
Eating CrowTo admit being wrong and apologize arrogantlyThe manager had to eat crow after the project’s failure.
Like There’s No TomorrowTo eat a lot without restraintAt the buffet, she was eating like there’s no tomorrow.
Eating Away AtTo gradually damage or consume somethingThe guilt was eating away at her after the mistake.
Out of the Palm of Someone’s HandTo be easily controlled or manipulatedThe con artist had everyone eating out of his hand.
Eating Away At NervesTo cause anxiety or stressThe impending deadline was eating away at her nerves.
Eating Someone AliveTo criticize or attack fiercelyThe harsh reviews were eating the artist alive.
Eating UpTo consume something eagerlyThe audience was eating up the comedian’s jokes.
Eating Someone’s DustTo be left behind or outdone by someoneIn the final lap, the slower racer ate someone’s dust.
Eating FireTo be extremely angryAfter the argument, it was evident he was eating fire.
Eating Bitter PillTo accept a difficult or unpleasant situationShe had to eat the bitter pill of loneliness.
Eating One’s Own CookingTo suffer consequences of one’s own actionsIgnoring warnings, he had to eat his own cooking.
Eating Dog FoodTo test or use a product one’s own company producesThe developer believed in eating their own dog food.
Eating Someone’s LunchTo outcompete or outperform someoneThe startup was eating the established companies’ lunch.
Eating Heart OutTo feel very sad or disappointedUnable to attend, I spent the night eating my heart out.
Eating Someone’s WordsTo force someone to retract a statementThe evidence made the critic eat his words.

Conclusion

In the vast landscape of the English language, idioms bring a unique flavor to our expressions, enriching our communication with imaginative and often humorous twists. The idioms for hunger showcased here paint a lively picture of the various states of being hungry, from the comical “eating like a horse” to the humbling experience of “eating humble pie.”

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